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Today's Stichomancy for Al Capone

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Battle of the Books by Jonathan Swift:

And when I brag of aid divine, Think Eusden's right as good as mine. Nor do I ask for Stella's sake; 'Tis my own credit lies at stake. And Stella will be sung, while I Can only be a stander by. Apollo having thought a little, Returned this answer to a tittle. Tho' you should live like old Methusalem, I furnish hints, and you should use all 'em, You yearly sing as she grows old,

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Charmides by Plato:

Temperance or Wisdom, as the connection seemed to require: for in the philosophy of Plato (Greek) still retains an intellectual element (as Socrates is also said to have identified (Greek) with (Greek): Xen. Mem.) and is not yet relegated to the sphere of moral virtue, as in the Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle.

The beautiful youth, Charmides, who is also the most temperate of human beings, is asked by Socrates, 'What is Temperance?' He answers characteristically, (1) 'Quietness.' 'But Temperance is a fine and noble thing; and quietness in many or most cases is not so fine a thing as quickness.' He tries again and says (2) that temperance is modesty. But this again is set aside by a sophistical application of Homer: for

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Philebus by Plato:

but illusory character?

PROTARCHUS: How do you mean?

SOCRATES: I mean to say that a man must be admitted to have real pleasure who is pleased with anything or anyhow; and he may be pleased about things which neither have nor have ever had any real existence, and, more often than not, are never likely to exist.

PROTARCHUS: Yes, Socrates, that again is undeniable.

SOCRATES: And may not the same be said about fear and anger and the like; are they not often false?

PROTARCHUS: Quite so.

SOCRATES: And can opinions be good or bad except in as far as they are