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Today's Stichomancy for Alan Moore

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Tanach:

Isaiah 34: 12 As for her nobles, none shall be there to be called to the kingdom; and all her princes shall be nothing.

Isaiah 34: 13 And thorns shall come up in her palaces, nettles and thistles in the fortresses thereof; and it shall be a habitation of wild-dogs, an enclosure for ostriches.

Isaiah 34: 14 And the wild-cats shall meet with the jackals, and the satyr shall cry to his fellow; yea, the night-monster shall repose there, and shall find her a place of rest.

Isaiah 34: 15 There shall the arrowsnake make her nest, and lay, and hatch, and brood under her shadow; yea, there shall the kites be gathered, every one with her mate.

Isaiah 34: 16 Seek ye out of the book of the LORD, and read; no one of these shall be missing, none shall want her mate; for My mouth it hath commanded, and the breath thereof it hath gathered them.

Isaiah 34: 17 And He hath cast the lot for them, and His hand hath divided it unto them by line; they shall possess it for ever, from generation to generation shall they dwell therein.

Isaiah 35: 1 The wilderness and the parched land shall be glad; and the desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose.

Isaiah 35: 2 It shall blossom abundantly, and rejoice, even with joy and singing; the glory of Lebanon shall be given unto it, the excellency of Carmel and Sharon; they shall see the glory of the LORD, the excellency of our God.

Isaiah 35: 3 Strengthen ye the weak hands, and make firm the tottering knees.


The Tanach
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Love and Friendship by Jane Austen:

make me happy." She pronounced these words in so mournfull and solemn an accent, that for some time I had not courage to reply. I was actually silenced. I recovered myself however in a few moments and looking at her with all the affection I could, "My dear Miss Grenville said I, you appear extremely young--and may probably stand in need of some one's advice whose regard for you, joined to superior Age, perhaps superior Judgement might authorise her to give it. I am that person, and I now challenge you to accept the offer I make you of my Confidence and Freindship, in return to which I shall only ask for yours--"

"You are extremely obliging Ma'am--said she--and I am highly


Love and Friendship
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Alcibiades II by Platonic Imitator:

of these arts or in regard to whom?

ALCIBIADES: I should call such a state bad, Socrates.

SOCRATES: You certainly would when you saw each of them rivalling the other and esteeming that of the greatest importance in the state,

'Wherein he himself most excelled.' (Euripides, Antiope.)

--I mean that which was best in any art, while he was entirely ignorant of what was best for himself and for the state, because, as I think, he trusts to opinion which is devoid of intelligence. In such a case should we not be right if we said that the state would be full of anarchy and lawlessness?

ALCIBIADES: Decidedly.