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Today's Stichomancy for Alan Moore

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from All's Well That Ends Well by William Shakespeare:

fool: drunkenness is his best virtue, for he will be swine-drunk; and in his sleep he does little harm, save to his bedclothes about him; but they know his conditions and lay him in straw. I have but little more to say, sir, of his honesty; he has everything that an honest man should not have; what an honest man should have he has nothing.

FIRST LORD. I begin to love him for this.

BERTRAM. For this description of thine honesty? A pox upon him for me; he's more and more a cat.

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Child of Storm by H. Rider Haggard:

these are royal; they are the children of low people. And yet--and yet I seem to smell the blood of Senzangakona."

He sniffed at the air as a dog does, and as he sniffed drew ever nearer to Nandie, till at last he laughed and pointed to her.

"_Your_ child, Princess, whose name I do not know. Your firstborn child, whom you loved more than your own heart."

She rose.

"Yes, yes, Nyanga," she cried. "I am the Princess Nandie, and he was my child, whom I loved more than my own heart."

"Haha!" said Zikali. "Dust, you did not lie to me. My Spirit, you did not lie to me. But now, tell me, Dust--and tell me, my Spirit--who


Child of Storm
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Secret Adversary by Agatha Christie:

bed and gave himself up to reflection. His head ached badly; also, he was hungry. The silence of the place was dispiriting.

"Anyway," said Tommy, trying to cheer himself, "I shall see the chief--the mysterious Mr. Brown and with a bit of luck in bluffing I shall see the mysterious Jane Finn also. After that----"

After that Tommy was forced to admit the prospect looked dreary.

CHAPTER XVII

ANNETTE

THE troubles of the future, however, soon faded before the troubles of the present. And of these, the most immediate and


Secret Adversary