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Today's Stichomancy for Alec Guinness

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Protagoras by Plato:

virtue and knowledge. That virtue cannot be taught is a paradox of the same sort as the profession of Socrates that he knew nothing. Plato means to say that virtue is not brought to a man, but must be drawn out of him; and cannot be taught by rhetorical discourses or citations from the poets. The second question, whether the virtues are one or many, though at first sight distinct, is really a part of the same subject; for if the virtues are to be taught, they must be reducible to a common principle; and this common principle is found to be knowledge. Here, as Aristotle remarks, Socrates and Plato outstep the truth--they make a part of virtue into the whole. Further, the nature of this knowledge, which is assumed to be a knowledge of pleasures and pains, appears to us too superficial and at

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from A Lover's Complaint by William Shakespeare:

And controversy hence a question takes, Whether the horse by him became his deed, Or he his manage by the well-doing steed.

'But quickly on this side the verdict went; His real habitude gave life and grace To appertainings and to ornament, Accomplish'd in himself, not in his case,: All aids, themselves made fairer by their place, Came for additions; yet their purpos'd trim Pierc'd not his grace, but were all grac'd by him.

'So on the tip of his subduing tongue

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll:

`Nine from eight I can't, you know,' Alice replied very readily: `but--'

`She can't do Subtraction,' said the White Queen. `Can you do Division? Divide a loaf by a knife--what's the answer to that?'

`I suppose--' Alice was beginning, but the Red Queen answered for her. `Bread-and-butter, of course. Try another Subtraction sum. Take a bone from a dog: what remains?'

Alice considered. `The bone wouldn't remain, of course, if I took it--and the dog wouldn't remain; it would come to bite me --and I'm sure I shouldn't remain!'

`Then you think nothing would remain?' said the Red Queen.


Through the Looking-Glass