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Today's Stichomancy for Alyssa Milano

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from King Henry VI by William Shakespeare:

CAPTAIN. First let my words stab him, as he hath me.

SUFFOLK. Base slave, thy words are blunt and so art thou.

CAPTAIN. Convey him hence, and on our long-boat's side Strike off his head.

SUFFOLK. Thou dar'st not, for thy own.

CAPTAIN. Yes, Pole!

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Critias by Plato:

thrived in that land; also the fruit which admits of cultivation, both the dry sort, which is given us for nourishment and any other which we use for food--we call them all by the common name of pulse, and the fruits having a hard rind, affording drinks and meats and ointments, and good store of chestnuts and the like, which furnish pleasure and amusement, and are fruits which spoil with keeping, and the pleasant kinds of dessert, with which we console ourselves after dinner, when we are tired of eating--all these that sacred island which then beheld the light of the sun, brought forth fair and wondrous and in infinite abundance. With such blessings the earth freely furnished them; meanwhile they went on constructing their temples and palaces and harbours and docks. And they arranged the whole

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Elizabeth and her German Garden by Marie Annette Beauchamp:

schoolboy at the end of his first term."

Minora was silent. Irais's foot was livelier than ever. The Man of Wrath stood smiling blandly <176> down upon us. You can't argue with a person so utterly convinced of his infallibility that he won't even get angry with you; so we sat round and said nothing.

"If," he went on, addressing Irais, who looked rebellious, "you doubt the truth of my remarks, and still cling to the old poetic notion of noble, self-sacrificing women tenderly helping the patient over the rough places on the road to death or recovery, let me beg you to try for yourself, next time any one in your house is ill,


Elizabeth and her German Garden