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Today's Stichomancy for Arnold Schwarzenegger

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Scarecrow of Oz by L. Frank Baum:

darkness.

It seemed like a long ride to her, yet in reality the Ork covered the distance in a wonderfully brief period of time and soon Trot stood safely beside Cap'n Bill on the level floor of a big arched tunnel. The sailor-man was very glad to greet his little comrade again and both were grateful to the Ork for his assistance.

"I dunno where this tunnel leads to," remarked Cap'n Bill, "but it surely looks more promisin' than that other hole we crept through."

"When the Ork is rested," said Trot, "we'll travel on


The Scarecrow of Oz
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Walking by Henry David Thoreau:

all the laws, by virtue of his relation to the lawmaker. "That is active duty," says the Vishnu Purana, "which is not for our bondage; that is knowledge which is for our liberation: all other duty is good only unto weariness; all other knowledge is only the cleverness of an artist."

It is remarkable how few events or crises there are in our histories, how little exercised we have been in our minds, how few experiences we have had. I would fain be assured that I am growing apace and rankly, though my very growth disturb this dull equanimity--though it be with struggle through long, dark, muggy nights or seasons of gloom. It would be well if all our lives


Walking
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Hellenica by Xenophon:

question: "What was your object in undertaking this business?" He answered: "I wished to be inferior to no man in Lacedaemon." Let that be as it might, his fate was to be taken out forthwith in irons, just as he was, and to be placed with his two hands and his neck in the collar, and so under scourge and goad to be driven, himself and his accomplices, round the city. Thus upon the heads of those was visited the penalty of their offences.

[8] "And pointed to a well-concerted plan."

[9] See Grote, "H. G." ix. 348.

[10] See Thuc. i. 131; Plut. "Lys." 19 (Clough, iii. p. 125).

[11] "The Hippagretes (or commander of the three hundred guards called