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Today's Stichomancy for Bonnie Parker

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from When the World Shook by H. Rider Haggard:

Nations do not desire his dominion. Therefore they fight for Liberty and Justice."

"As it was, so it is and shall be," remarked Oro, "only with this difference. In the old world some were wise, but here--" and he stopped, his eyes fixed upon the Armenian woman struggling in her death agony while the murderer drowned her child, then added: "Let us go."

Our road ran across the sea. On it we saw a ship so large that it attracted Oro's attention, and for once he expressed astonishment.

"In my day," he said, "we had no vessels of this greatness in


When the World Shook
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Lesser Hippias by Plato:

EUDICUS: But I do not think, Socrates, that Hippias will require any entreaty of mine; for he has already said that he will refuse to answer no man.--Did you not say so, Hippias?

HIPPIAS: Yes, I did; but then, Eudicus, Socrates is always troublesome in an argument, and appears to be dishonest. (Compare Gorgias; Republic.)

SOCRATES: Excellent Hippias, I do not do so intentionally (if I did, it would show me to be a wise man and a master of wiles, as you would argue), but unintentionally, and therefore you must pardon me; for, as you say, he who is unintentionally dishonest should be pardoned.

EUDICUS: Yes, Hippias, do as he says; and for our sake, and also that you may not belie your profession, answer whatever Socrates asks you.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass:

anybody. That was a precious dollar to me. You remember when I used to make seven, or eight, or even nine dollars a week in Baltimore, you would take every cent of it from me every Saturday night, saying that I belonged to you, and my earnings also. I never liked this conduct on your part--to say the best, I thought it a little mean. I would not have served you so. But let that pass. I was a little awkward about counting money in New England fashion when I first landed in New Bedford. I came near betraying myself several times. I caught myself saying phip, for fourpence; and at one time a man actually charged me with being a runaway, whereupon I was silly enough to become one by running


My Bondage and My Freedom