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Today's Stichomancy for Bruce Willis

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from At the Earth's Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs:

my mind filled with the horrors of my position as I thought of the terrible doom which awaited me the moment the eyes of the reptiles fell upon the creature that had disturbed their slumber.

As long as I could I remained beneath the surface, swimming rapidly in the direction of the islands that I might prolong my life to the utmost. At last I was forced to rise for air, and as I cast a terrified glance in the direction of the Mahars and the thipdars I was almost stunned to see that not a single one remained upon the rocks where I had last seen them, nor as I searched

At the Earth's Core
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Grimm's Fairy Tales by Brothers Grimm:

there. Scarcely were they up, than who should come by but the very rogues they were looking for. They were in truth great rascals, and belonged to that class of people who find things before they are lost; they were tired; so they sat down and made a fire under the very tree where Frederick and Catherine were. Frederick slipped down on the other side, and picked up some stones. Then he climbed up again, and tried to hit the thieves on the head with them: but they only said, 'It must be near morning, for the wind shakes the fir-apples down.'

Catherine, who had the door on her shoulder, began to be very tired; but she thought it was the nuts upon it that were so heavy: so she said softly, 'Frederick, I must let the nuts go.' 'No,' answered he,

Grimm's Fairy Tales
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Cromwell by William Shakespeare:

I pray, excuse me; this shall well suffice To bear my charges to Bononia, Whereas a noble Earl is much distressed: An Englishman, Russell, the Earl of Bedford, Is by the French King sold unto his death: It may fall out, that I may do him good; To save his life, I'll hazard my heart blood. Therefore, kind sir, thanks for your liberal gift; I must be gone to aide him; there's no shift.

FRISKIBALL. I'll be no hinderer to so good an act.