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Today's Stichomancy for Calvin Klein

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Art of War by Sun Tzu:

Han Hsin (d. 196 B.C.), [49] Feng I (d. 34 A.D.), [50] Lu Meng (d. 219), [51] and Yo Fei (1103-1141). [52] The opinion of Ts`ao Kung, who disputes with Han Hsin the highest place in Chinese military annals, has already been recorded. [53] Still more remarkable, in one way, is the testimony of purely literary men, such as Su Hsun (the father of Su Tung-p`o), who wrote several essays on military topics, all of which owe their chief inspiration to Sun Tzu. The following short passage by him is preserved in the YU HAI: [54] --

Sun Wu's saying, that in war one cannot make certain of conquering, [55] is very different indeed from what other


The Art of War
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Captain Stormfield by Mark Twain:

and Territories of the Union, and all the kingdoms of the earth and the islands of the sea are laid out here just as they are on the globe - all the same shape they are down there, and all graded to the relative size, only each State and realm and island is a good many billion times bigger here than it is below. There goes another blast."

"What is that one for?"

"That is only another fort answering the first one. They each fire eleven hundred and one thunder blasts at a single dash - it is the usual salute for an eleventh-hour guest; a hundred for each hour and an extra one for the guest's sex; if it was a woman we would

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from King Henry VI by William Shakespeare:

The gates made fast!--Brother, I like not this; For many men that stumble at the threshold Are well foretold that danger lurks within.

KING EDWARD. Tush, man! abodements must not now affright us; By fair or foul means we must enter in, For hither will our friends repair to us.

HASTINGS. My liege, I'll knock once more to summon them.

[Enter on the walls, the Mayor of York and his Brethren.]

MAYOR.