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Today's Stichomancy for Charles Lindbergh

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Market-Place by Harold Frederic:

Thorpe's lips pouted over a reply. "Well--no," he said, with a kind of reluctance. "He got strictly what he was entitled to--precisely what I had promised him--and he wrung up his nose at that--and then I actually gave him 15,000 pounds he wasn't entitled to at all."

"I hardly see what it proves, then," Edith Cressage remarked, and the subject was dropped.

Some two hours later, Thorpe took his departure. It was not until he was getting into the hansom which had been summoned, that it all at once occurred to him that he had not for a moment been alone with his betrothed.

The Market-Place
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Captain Stormfield by Mark Twain:

clerks, you know - wondering why I didn't get under way. I couldn't stand this long - it was too uncomfortable. So at last I plucked up courage and tipped the head clerk a signal. He says -

"What! you here yet? What's wanting?"

Says I, in a low voice and very confidential, making a trumpet with my hands at his ear -

"I beg pardon, and you mustn't mind my reminding you, and seeming to meddle, but hain't you forgot something?"

He studied a second, and says -

"Forgot something? . . . No, not that I know of."

"Think," says I.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Salammbo by Gustave Flaubert:

One night he went in.

Matho, as naked as a corpse, was lying on a lion's skin flat on his stomach, with his face in both his hands; a hanging lamp lit up his armour, which was hooked on to the tent-pole above his head.

"You are suffering?" said the slave to him. "What is the matter with you? Answer me?" And he shook him by the shoulder calling him several times, "Master! master!"

At last Matho lifted large troubled eyes towards him.

"Listen!" he said in a low voice, and with a finger on his lips. "It is the wrath of the Gods! Hamilcar's daughter pursues me! I am afraid of her, Spendius!" He pressed himself close against his breast like a