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Today's Stichomancy for Charles Manson

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from In the Cage by Henry James:

moment to moment there was less left to cipher about. The week proves blissfully fine, and her mother, at their lodgings--partly to her embarrassment and partly to her relief--struck up with the landlady an alliance that left the younger couple a great deal of freedom. This relative took her pleasure of a week at Bournemouth in a stuffy back-kitchen and endless talks; to that degree even that Mr. Mudge himself--habitually inclined indeed to a scrutiny of all mysteries and to seeing, as he sometimes admitted, too much in things--made remarks on it as he sat on the cliff with his betrothed, or on the decks of steamers that conveyed them, close- packed items in terrific totals of enjoyment, to the Isle of Wight

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley:

August l9, 17-

Yesterday the stranger said to me, "You may easily perceive, Captain Walton, that I have suffered great and unparalleled misfortunes. I had determined at one time that the memory of these evils should die with me, but you have won me to alter my determination. You seek for knowledge and wisdom, as I once did; and I ardently hope that the gratification of your wishes may not be a serpent to sting you, as mine has been. I do not know that the relation of my disasters will be useful to you; yet, when I reflect that you are pursuing the same course, exposing yourself to the same dangers which have rendered me what I am, I imagine that you may


Frankenstein
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Menexenus by Plato:

by the victory which they gained over the barbarians first taught other men that the power of the Persians was not invincible, but that hosts of men and the multitude of riches alike yield to valour. And I assert that those men are the fathers not only of ourselves, but of our liberties and of the liberties of all who are on the continent, for that was the action to which the Hellenes looked back when they ventured to fight for their own safety in the battles which ensued: they became disciples of the men of Marathon. To them, therefore, I assign in my speech the first place, and the second to those who fought and conquered in the sea fights at Salamis and Artemisium; for of them, too, one might have many things to say--of the assaults which they endured by sea and land, and how they repelled them. I