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Today's Stichomancy for Claire Forlani

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from De Profundis by Oscar Wilde:

with pleasure, as one might fill a cup to the very brim with wine. Now I am approaching life from a completely new standpoint, and even to conceive happiness is often extremely difficult for me. I remember during my first term at Oxford reading in Pater's RENAISSANCE - that book which has had such strange influence over my life - how Dante places low in the Inferno those who wilfully live in sadness; and going to the college library and turning to the passage in the DIVINE COMEDY where beneath the dreary marsh lie those who were 'sullen in the sweet air,' saying for ever and ever through their sighs -

'Tristi fummo

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Les Miserables by Victor Hugo:

we find it taller. To be always peaceful does not depend on progress any more than it does on the stream; erect no barriers, cast in no boulders; obstacles make water froth and humanity boil. Hence arise troubles; but after these troubles, we recognize the fact that ground has been gained. Until order, which is nothing else than universal peace, has been established, until harmony and unity reign, progress will have revolutions as its halting-places.

What, then, is progress? We have just enunciated it; the permanent life of the peoples.

Now, it sometimes happens, that the momentary life of individuals offers resistance to the eternal life of the human race.


Les Miserables
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Out of Time's Abyss by Edgar Rice Burroughs:

toward the center of it.

Breakfastless and with shaken nerves the two survivors plunged madly into the long day's march. Both were strong, courageous, resourceful men; but each had reached the limit of human nerve endurance and each felt that he would rather die than spend another night in the hideous open of that frightful land. Vivid in the mind of each was a picture of Bradley's end, for though neither had witnessed the tragedy, both could imagine almost precisely what had occurred. They did not discuss it--they did not even mention it--yet all day long the thing was uppermost in the mind of each and mingled with it a similar picture with himself


Out of Time's Abyss