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Today's Stichomancy for Coco Chanel

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Whirligigs by O. Henry:

The m. e. knew all that, and said so. He asked each man how long he had worked on the paper. Not one of them had drawn pay from an Enterprise envelope for longer than six years. Calloway had been on the paper twelve years. "Try old Heffelbauer," said the m. e. "He was here when Park Row was a potato patch."

Heffelbauer was an institution. He was half janitor, half handy-man about the office, and half watchman -- thus becoming the peer of thirteen and one-half tailors.

Sent for, he came, radiating his nationality. "Heffelbauer," said the m. e., "did you ever hear of a

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Cratylus by Plato:

pronouns or in the verb of existence of which the forms were too common and therefore too deeply imbedded in language entirely to drop out. The same verbs in the same meaning may sometimes take one case, sometimes another. The participle may also have the character of an adjective, the adverb either of an adjective or of a preposition. These exceptions are as regular as the rules, but the causes of them are seldom known to us.

Language, like the animal and vegetable worlds, is everywhere intersected by the lines of analogy. Like number from which it seems to be derived, the principle of analogy opens the eyes of men to discern the similarities and differences of things, and their relations to one another. At first these are such as lie on the surface only; after a time they are seen by

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Where There's A Will by Mary Roberts Rinehart:

Doctor Barnes' cigarette.

"Curious old world, isn't it?" she said between puffs. "Here we are the three of us--snug and nice, having seven kinds of hell- fire water and not having to pay for it; three meals a day and afternoon tea ditto, good beds and steam-heat ditto--and four days ago where were we? Pierce, you were hocking your clothes! Doc, you--"

"Washing dishes!" he said. "I never knew before how extravagant it is to have a saucer under a cup!"

"And I!" she went on, "I, Julia Summers, was staring at a ceiling in the Finleyville hotel, with a face that looked like a toy