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Today's Stichomancy for David Letterman

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Witch, et. al by Anton Chekhov:

live on. The nearest village is Markovka, and that's over three miles away. Savely is on the retired list now, and has got the watchman's job; he has to look after the church. . . ."

And the postman was immediately informed that if Savely were to go to the General's lady and ask her for a letter to the bishop, he would be given a good berth. "But he doesn't go to the General's lady because he is lazy and afraid of people. We belong to the clergy all the same . . ." added Raissa.

"What do you live on?" asked the postman.

"There's a kitchen garden and a meadow belonging to the church. Only we don't get much from that," sighed Raissa. "The old

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Outlaw of Torn by Edgar Rice Burroughs:

don," replied Norman of Torn.

"I asked not your mission," cried the fellow. "I asked, who be ye? Answer, and be quick about it."

"I be Roger de Conde, gentleman of France, and these be my sisters and servants," lied the outlaw, "and were it not that the ladies be with me your answer would be couched in steel, as you deserve for your boorish insolence."

"There be plenty of room and time for that even now, you dog of a French coward," cried the officer, couching his lance as he spoke.


The Outlaw of Torn
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Eryxias by Platonic Imitator:

And I, retorted Critias, should say that there is no one whom I could not compel to admit that riches are bad for some men. But surely, if they were a good, they could not appear bad for any one?

Here I interposed and said to them: If you two were having an argument about equitation and what was the best way of riding, supposing that I knew the art myself, I should try to bring you to an agreement. For I should be ashamed if I were present and did not do what I could to prevent your difference. And I should do the same if you were quarrelling about any other art and were likely, unless you agreed on the point in dispute, to part as enemies instead of as friends. But now, when we are contending about a thing of which the usefulness continues during the whole of life,