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Today's Stichomancy for Donald Trump

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Night and Day by Virginia Woolf:

his brain in check; and all the time she was in fancy looking up through a telescope at white shadow-cleft disks which were other worlds, until she felt herself possessed of two bodies, one walking by the river with Denham, the other concentrated to a silver globe aloft in the fine blue space above the scum of vapors that was covering the visible world. She looked at the sky once, and saw that no star was keen enough to pierce the flight of watery clouds now coursing rapidly before the west wind. She looked down hurriedly again. There was no reason, she assured herself, for this feeling of happiness; she was not free; she was not alone; she was still bound to earth by a million fibres; every step took her nearer home. Nevertheless, she exulted as

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from New Poems by Robert Louis Stevenson:

Till the roar of the march by country and town Shall shake the tottering Dagons down.

For I was objectless as they And loitering idly day by day; But whenever I heard the recruiters come, I left my all to follow the drum.

THE VANQUISHED KNIGHT

I HAVE left all upon the shameful field, Honour and Hope, my God, and all but life; Spurless, with sword reversed and dinted shield, Degraded and disgraced, I leave the strife.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Unseen World and Other Essays by John Fiske:

you that are full now, for ye will hunger." The parable of Dives and Lazarus illustrates concretely this view of the case, which is still further corroborated by the account, given in both the first and the third gospels, of the young man who came to seek everlasting life. Jesus here maintains that righteousness is insufficient unless voluntary poverty be superadded. Though the young man has strictly fulfilled the greatest of the commandments,--to love his neighbour as himself,--he is required, as a needful proof of his sincerity, to distribute all his vast possessions among the poor. And when he naturally manifests a reluctance to perform so superfluous a sacrifice, Jesus observes


The Unseen World and Other Essays