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Today's Stichomancy for Edward Norton

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Cratylus by Plato:

shall be exactly the same with the thing; but allow the occasional substitution of a wrong letter, and if of a letter also of a noun in a sentence, and if of a noun in a sentence also of a sentence which is not appropriate to the matter, and acknowledge that the thing may be named, and described, so long as the general character of the thing which you are describing is retained; and this, as you will remember, was remarked by Hermogenes and myself in the particular instance of the names of the letters.

CRATYLUS: Yes, I remember.

SOCRATES: Good; and when the general character is preserved, even if some of the proper letters are wanting, still the thing is signified;--well, if

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Sportsman by Xenophon:

the earth,[7] will render the soil bad for scent until it dries again. Southerly winds will not improve scent--being moisture-laden they disperse it; whereas northerly winds, provided the scent has not been previously destroyed, tend to fix and preserve it. Rains will drown and wash it away, and so will drizzle; while the moon by her heat[8]-- especially a full moon--will dull its edge; in fact the trail is rarest--most irregular[9]--at such times, for the hares in their joy at the light with frolic and gambol[10] literally throw themselves high into the air and set long intervals between one footfall and another. Or again, the trail will become confused and misleading when crossed by that of foxes.[11]

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce:

there! Greatly perplexed, they consulted the local priest, who told them that their captive was undoubtedly a werewolf and had resumed its human for during the night. "The next time that you take a wolf," the good man said, "see that you chain it by the leg, and in the morning you will find a Lutheran."

WHANGDEPOOTENAWAH, n. In the Ojibwa tongue, disaster; an unexpected affliction that strikes hard.

Should you ask me whence this laughter, Whence this audible big-smiling, With its labial extension, With its maxillar distortion


The Devil's Dictionary