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Today's Stichomancy for Fidel Castro

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain:

from a stalactite overhead. The captive had broken off the stalagmite, and upon the stump had placed a stone, wherein he had scooped a shallow hollow to catch the precious drop that fell once in every three minutes with the dreary regularity of a clock-tick -- a dessertspoonful once in four and twenty hours. That drop was falling when the Pyramids were new; when Troy fell; when the foundations of Rome were laid when Christ was crucified; when the Conqueror created the British empire; when Columbus sailed; when the massacre at Lexington was "news." It is


The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from King Henry VI by William Shakespeare:

And many strokes, though with a little axe, Hew down and fell the hardest-timber'd oak. By many hands your father was subdu'd, But only slaught'red by the ireful arm Of unrelenting Clifford and the queen, Who crown'd the gracious duke in high despite, Laugh'd in his face, and when with grief he wept The ruthless queen gave him, to dry his cheeks, A napkin steeped in the harmless blood Of sweet young Rutland, by rough Clifford slain. And, after many scorns, many foul taunts,

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis:

up. Mighty glad to met you."

Babbitt lay awake in the close hot tomb of his Pullman berth, shaking with remembrance of the fat man's limerick about the lady who wished to be wild. He raised the shade; he lay with a puffy arm tucked between his head and the skimpy pillow, looking out on the sliding silhouettes of trees, and village lamps like exclamation-points. He was very happy.

CHAPTER XI

I

THEY had four hours in New York between trains. The one thing Babbitt wished to see was the Pennsylvania Hotel, which had been built since his last visit. He stared up at it, muttering, "Twenty-two hundred rooms and twenty-two