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Today's Stichomancy for Frank Sinatra

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Barnaby Rudge by Charles Dickens:

fiery face in a half-gallon can. 'Don't you consider this a good beginning, mister?'

'Give me security that it an't a ending,' rejoined the hangman. 'When that soldier went down, we might have made London ours; but no;--we stand, and gape, and look on--the justice (I wish he had had a bullet in each eye, as he would have had, if we'd gone to work my way) says, "My lads, if you'll give me your word to disperse, I'll order off the military," our people sets up a hurrah, throws up the game with the winning cards in their hands, and skulks away like a pack of tame curs as they are. Ah,' said the hangman, in a tone of deep disgust, 'it makes me blush for my


Barnaby Rudge
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The House of Dust by Conrad Aiken:

The moon stares down like a half-closed eye. The leaves are scattered, the birds are blown, Oaks crash down in the darkness, We run from our windy shadows; we are running alone.

* * * * *

The moon was darkened: across it flew The swift grey tenebrous shape he knew, Like a thing of smoke it crossed the sky, The witch! he said. And he heard a cry, And another came, and another came, And one, grown duskily red with blood,

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Proposed Roads To Freedom by Bertrand Russell:

subject of food production. But Kropotkin is an exception. His two books, ``The Conquest of Bread'' and ``Fields, Factories and Workshops,'' are very full of detailed information, and, even making great allowances for an optimistic bias, I do not think it can be denied that they demonstrate possibilities in which few of us would otherwise have believed.

Malthus contended, in effect, that population always tends to increase up to the limit of subsistence, that the production of food becomes more expensive as its amount is increased, and that therefore, apart