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Today's Stichomancy for Fritz Lang

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Lesser Bourgeoisie by Honore de Balzac:

of the Academy?"

"How clever monsieur is, and how well he understands things!" she replied, smiling.

"And also," continued the barrister, "you don't want to keep that money openly in your possession?"

"For fear my master should find it out and get it away from me? Exactly. Besides, as monsieur will understand, I shouldn't be sorry, in order to supply the poor dear man with extra comforts, that the sum should bear interest."

"And the highest possible interest," said the barrister.

"Oh! as for that, monsieur, five or six per cent."

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Rape of Lucrece by William Shakespeare:

But happy monarchs still are fear'd for love: With foul offenders thou perforce must bear, When they in thee the like offences prove: If but for fear of this, thy will remove; For princes are the glass, the school, the book, Where subjects eyes do learn, do read, do look.

'And wilt thou be the school where Lust shall learn? Must he in thee read lectures of such shame: Wilt thou be glass, wherein it shall discern Authority for sin, warrant for blame, To privilege dishonour in thy name?

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift:

the vulgar and illiterate, had not threatened to raise a rebellion unless they might be allowed the liberty to speak with their tongues, after the manner of their forefathers; such constant irreconcilable enemies to science are the common people.

However, many of the most learned and wise adhere to the new scheme of expressing themselves by things; which has only this inconvenience attending it, that if a man's business be very great, and of various kinds, he must be obliged, in proportion, to carry a greater bundle of things upon his back, unless he can afford one or two strong servants to attend him. I have often beheld two of those sages almost sinking under the weight of


Gulliver's Travels