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Today's Stichomancy for George Armstrong Custer

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Merry Men by Robert Louis Stevenson:

behaviour. She observed that he embraced the boy three times in the course of the evening, and managed generally to confound and abash the little fellow out of speech and appetite. But she had the true womanly heroism in little affairs. Not only did she refrain from the cheap revenge of exposing the Doctor's errors to himself, but she did her best to remove their ill-effect on Jean- Marie. When Desprez went out for his last breath of air before retiring for the night, she came over to the boy's side and took his hand.

'You must not be surprised nor frightened by my husband's manners,' she said. 'He is the kindest of men, but so clever that he is

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Walden by Henry David Thoreau:

I could use various substitutes beside those which I have named. "For," as the Forefathers sang,--

"we can make liquor to sweeten our lips Of pumpkins and parsnips and walnut-tree chips."

Finally, as for salt, that grossest of groceries, to obtain this might be a fit occasion for a visit to the seashore, or, if I did without it altogether, I should probably drink the less water. I do not learn that the Indians ever troubled themselves to go after it. Thus I could avoid all trade and barter, so far as my food was concerned, and having a shelter already, it would only remain to get clothing and fuel. The pantaloons which I now wear were woven in a

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Europeans by Henry James:

to Charlotte that there would be a great many things to talk about; but the Baroness was apparently inclined to talk about nothing.

"Write her a note, asking her leave to come and see her. I think that is what she will like," said Gertrude.

"Why should I give her the trouble of answering me?" Charlotte asked. "She will have to write a note and send it over."

"I don't think she will take any trouble," said Gertrude, profoundly.

"What then will she do?"

"That is what I am curious to see," said Gertrude, leaving her sister with an impression that her curiosity was morbid.

They went to see the Baroness without preliminary correspondence;