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Today's Stichomancy for George W. Bush

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Historical Lecturers and Essays by Charles Kingsley:

be.

England WAS to be conquered by the Norman; but by the civilised, not the barbaric; by the Norse who had settled, but four generations before, in the North East of France under Rou, Rollo, Rolf the Ganger--so-called, they say, because his legs were so long that, when on horseback, he touched the ground and seemed to gang, or walk. He and his Norsemen had taken their share of France, and called it Normandy to this day; and meanwhile, with that docility and adaptability which marks so often truly great spirits, they had changed their creed, their language, their habits, and had become, from heathen and murderous Berserkers, the most truly civilised

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from A Lover's Complaint by William Shakespeare:

To make the weeper laugh, the laugher weep, He had the dialect and different skill, Catching all passions in his craft of will;

'That he did in the general bosom reign Of young, of old; and sexes both enchanted, To dwell with him in thoughts, or to remain In personal duty, following where he haunted: Consents bewitch'd, ere he desire, have granted; And dialogued for him what he would say, Ask'd their own wills, and made their wills obey.

'Many there were that did his picture get,

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Lucile by Owen Meredith:

The sofa, her face from the glass was reflected. Her dark eyes were fix'd on the ground. Pale, dejected, And lost in profound meditation she seem'd. Softly, silently, over her droop'd shoulders stream'd The afternoon sunlight. The cry of alarm And surprise which escaped her, as now on her arm Alfred Vargrave let fall a hand icily cold And clammy as death, all too cruelly told How far he had been from her thoughts.

XXII.

All his cheek