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Today's Stichomancy for Hugh Jackman

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Golden Threshold by Sarojini Naidu:

The flower deferred, the fruit denied; But not the peace, supremely won, Lord Buddha, of thy Lotus-throne.

With futile hands we seek to gain Our inaccessible desire, Diviner summits to attain, With faith that sinks and feet that tire; But nought shall conquer or control The heavenward hunger of our soul.

The end, elusive and afar, Still lures us with its beckoning flight,

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Prince by Nicolo Machiavelli:

service of the state. Antoninus had not taken this care, but had contumeliously killed a brother of that centurion, whom also he daily threatened, yet retained in his bodyguard; which, as it turned out, was a rash thing to do, and proved the emperor's ruin.

But let us come to Commodus, to whom it should have been very easy to hold the empire, for, being the son of Marcus, he had inherited it, and he had only to follow in the footsteps of his father to please his people and soldiers; but, being by nature cruel and brutal, he gave himself up to amusing the soldiers and corrupting them, so that he might indulge his rapacity upon the people; on the other hand, not maintaining his dignity, often descending to the theatre to compete


The Prince
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from In the South Seas by Robert Louis Stevenson:

his night's adventure to the king; that I should still allow him, when he had an errand, to come within my tapu-line by day; but if ever I found him there after the set of the sun I would shoot him on the spot; and to the proof showed him a revolver. He must have been incredibly relieved; but he showed no sign of it, took himself off with his usual dandy nonchalance, and was scarce seen by us again.

These five, then, with the substitution of the steward for the cook, came and went, and were our only visitors. The circle of the tapu held at arm's-length the inhabitants of the village. As for 'my pamily,' they dwelt like nuns in their enclosure; only once