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Today's Stichomancy for Igor Stravinsky

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Tanach:

Leviticus 26: 21 And if ye walk contrary unto Me, and will not hearken unto Me; I will bring seven times more plagues upon you according to your sins.

Leviticus 26: 22 And I will send the beast of the field among you, which shall rob you of your children, and destroy your cattle, and make you few in number; and your ways shall become desolate.

Leviticus 26: 23 And if in spite of these things ye will not be corrected unto Me, but will walk contrary unto Me;

Leviticus 26: 24 then will I also walk contrary unto you; and I will smite you, even I, seven times for your sins.

Leviticus 26: 25 And I will bring a sword upon you, that shall execute the vengeance of the covenant; and ye shall be gathered together within your cities; and I will send the pestilence among you; and ye shall be delivered into the hand of the enemy.

Leviticus 26: 26 When I break your staff of bread, ten women shall bake your bread in one oven, and they shall deliver your bread again by weight; and ye shall eat, and not be satisfied.

Leviticus 26: 27 And if ye will not for all this hearken unto Me, but walk contrary unto Me;

Leviticus 26: 28 then I will walk contrary unto you in fury; and I also will chastise you seven times for your sins.

Leviticus 26: 29 And ye shall eat the flesh of your sons, and the flesh of your daughters shall ye eat.

Leviticus 26: 30 And I will destroy your high places, and cut down your sun-pillars, and cast your carcasses upon the carcasses of your idols; and My soul shall abhor you.


The Tanach
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Charmides by Plato:

all the other sciences, are regulated by the higher science or knowledge of knowledge. Socrates replies by again dividing the abstract from the concrete, and asks how this knowledge conduces to happiness in the same definite way in which medicine conduces to health.

And now, after making all these concessions, which are really inadmissible, we are still as far as ever from ascertaining the nature of temperance, which Charmides has already discovered, and had therefore better rest in the knowledge that the more temperate he is the happier he will be, and not trouble himself with the speculations of Socrates.

In this Dialogue may be noted (1) The Greek ideal of beauty and goodness, the vision of the fair soul in the fair body, realised in the beautiful

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Menexenus by Plato:

and there is no similar instance of a 'motive' which is taken from Xenophon in an undoubted dialogue of Plato. On the other hand, the upholders of the genuineness of the dialogue will find in the Hippias a true Socratic spirit; they will compare the Ion as being akin both in subject and treatment; they will urge the authority of Aristotle; and they will detect in the treatment of the Sophist, in the satirical reasoning upon Homer, in the reductio ad absurdum of the doctrine that vice is ignorance, traces of a Platonic authorship. In reference to the last point we are doubtful, as in some of the other dialogues, whether the author is asserting or overthrowing the paradox of Socrates, or merely following the argument 'whither the wind blows.' That no conclusion is arrived at is also in