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Today's Stichomancy for Jennifer Love Hewitt

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas:

who esteems himself most fortunate in having been able to save you from a further continuance of your sufferings."

"My wretched curiosity has brought all this about," pursued the lady. "All Paris rung with the praises of Madame Danglars' beautiful horses, and I had the folly to desire to know whether they really merited the high praise given to them."

"Is it possible," exclaimed the count with well-feigned astonishment, "that these horses belong to the baroness?"

"They do, indeed. May I inquire if you are acquainted with Madame Danglars?"


The Count of Monte Cristo
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Poems of William Blake by William Blake:

Why cannot the Ear be closed to its own destruction? Or the glistening Eye to the poison of a smile! Why are Eyelids stord with arrows ready drawn, Where a thousand fighting men in ambush lie! Or an Eye of gifts & graces showring fruits & coined gold!

Why a Tongue impress'd with honey from every wind? Why an Ear, a whirlpool fierce to draw creations in? Why a Nostril wide inhaling terror trembling & affright Why a tender curb upon the youthful burning boy? Why a little curtain of flesh on the bed of our desire?

The Virgin started from her seat, & with a shriek,


Poems of William Blake
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Barnaby Rudge by Charles Dickens:

laughed again.

'I hear,' he said smoothly, as he stood among them with a great measure of liquor in his hand, and filled their glasses as quickly and as often as they chose, 'I hear--but I cannot say whether it be true or false--that the men who are loitering in the streets to- night are half disposed to pull down a Romish chapel or two, and that they only want leaders. I even heard mention of those in Duke Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, and in Warwick Street, Golden Square; but common report, you know--You are not going?'

--'To do nothing, rnaster, eh?' cried Hugh. 'No jails and halter for Barnaby and me. They must be frightened out of that. Leaders


Barnaby Rudge