Tarot Runes I Ching Stichomancy Contact
Store Numerology Coin Flip Yes or No Webmasters
Personal Celebrity Biorhythms Bibliomancy Settings

Today's Stichomancy for Jesse James

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Recruit by Honore de Balzac:

still hung with dingy tapestries; she used the country furniture, burned tallow candles, and followed the customs of the town,--adopting provincial life, and not shrinking from its pettiness or its many disagreeable privations. Knowing, however, that her guests would pardon luxuries if provided for their own comfort, she neglected nothing which conduced to their personal enjoyment, and gave them, more especially, excellent dinners.

Toward seven o'clock on this memorable evening, her guests were all assembled in a wide circle around the fireplace. The mistress of the house, sustained in her part by the sympathizing glances of the old merchant, submitted with wonderful courage to the minute questioning

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Economist by Xenophon:

these floods beneath a coat of mud and slime, or else that the roots are laid quite bare in places by the torrent. By reason of this same drench, I take it, oftentimes an undergrowth of weeds springs up with the corn and chokes it.

Soc. Yes, all these ills are likely enough to happen.

Isch. Are you not agreed the corn-fields sorely need relief at such a season?

Soc. Assuredly.

Isch. Then what is to be done, in your opinion? How shall we aid the stricken portion lying mud-bedabbled?

Soc. How better than by lifting up and lightening the soil?

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Venus and Adonis by William Shakespeare:

Could rule them both without ten women's wit.'

Thus hoping that Adonis is alive, 1009 Her rash suspect sile doth extenuate; And that his beauty may the better thrive, With Death she humbly doth insinuate; 1012 Tells him of trophies, statues, tombs; and stories His victories, his triumphs, and his glories.

'O Jove!' quoth she, 'how much a fool was I, To be of such a weak and silly mind 1016 To wail his death who lives and must not die Till mutual overthrow of mortal kind;