Tarot Runes I Ching Stichomancy Contact
Store Numerology Coin Flip Yes or No Webmasters
Personal Celebrity Biorhythms Bibliomancy Settings

Today's Stichomancy for Jim Jones

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin:

eggs, which they lay in their burrows: the inhabitants seek them for food.

These two species of Amblyrhynchus agree, as I have already stated, in their general structure, and in many of their habits. Neither have that rapid movement, so characteristic of the genera Lacerta and Iguana. They are both herbivorous, although the kind of vegetation on which they feed is so very different. Mr. Bell has given the name to the genus from the shortness of the snout: indeed, the form of the mouth may almost be compared to that of the tortoise: one is led to suppose that this is an adaptation to their


The Voyage of the Beagle
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Polly of the Circus by Margaret Mayo:

"No, Miss Polly, I have never seen a circus," Douglas told her half-regretfully, a sense of his deep privation stealing upon him.

"What!" cried Polly, incredulously.

"Lordy no, chile; he ain't nebber seed none ob dem tings," Mandy interrupted, as she tried to arrange a few short-stemmed posies in a variegated bouquet.

"Well, what do you think of that!" Polly gasped. "You're the first rube I ever saw that hadn't." She was looking at him as though he were a curiosity.

"So I'm a rube!" Douglas shook his head with a sad, little smile

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from De Profundis by Oscar Wilde:

better. I have said that behind sorrow there is always sorrow. It were wiser still to say that behind sorrow there is always a soul. And to mock at a soul in pain is a dreadful thing. In the strangely simple economy of the world people only get what they give, and to those who have not enough imagination to penetrate the mere outward of things, and feel pity, what pity can be given save that of scorn?

I write this account of the mode of my being transferred here simply that it should be realised how hard it has been for me to get anything out of my punishment but bitterness and despair. I have, however, to do it, and now and then I have moments of