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Today's Stichomancy for Jim Morrison

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne:

hanging upon his trembling lips!' (I would not read another line of it, quoth Trim for all this world;--I fear, an' please your Honours, all this is in Portugal, where my poor brother Tom is. I tell thee, Trim, again, quoth my father, 'tis not an historical account,--'tis a description.--'Tis only a description, honest man, quoth Slop, there's not a word of truth in it.--That's another story, replied my father.--However, as Trim reads it with so much concern,--'tis cruelty to force him to go on with it.--Give me hold of the sermon, Trim,--I'll finish it for thee, and thou may'st go. I must stay and hear it too, replied Trim, if your Honour will allow me;-- tho' I would not read it myself for a Colonel's pay.--Poor Trim! quoth my uncle Toby. My father went on.)

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Collected Articles by Frederick Douglass:

has been spoken in favor of equal rights and impartial suffrage. Radicalism, so far from being odious, is not the popular passport to power. The men most bitterly charged with it go to Congress with the largest majorities, while the timid and doubtful are sent by lean majorities, or else left at home. The strange controversy between the President and the Congress, at one time so threatening, is disposed of by the people. The high reconstructive powers which he so confidently, ostentatiously, and haughtily claimed, have been disallowed, denounced, and utterly repudiated; while those claimed by Congress have been confirmed.

Of the spirit and magnitude of the canvass nothing need be said. The appeal was to the people, and the verdict was worthy of the tribunal.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Some Reminiscences by Joseph Conrad:

Madame Delestang, catching sight of my raised hat, would beckon me with an amiable imperiousness to the side of the carriage, and suggest with an air of amused nonchalance, "Venez donc faire un tour avec nous," to which the husband would add an encouraging "C'est ca. Allons, montez, jeune homme." He questioned me sometimes, significantly but with perfect tact and delicacy, as to the way I employed my time, and never failed to express the hope that I wrote regularly to my "honoured uncle." I made no secret of the way I employed my time, and I rather fancy that my artless tales of the pilots and so on entertained Madame Delestang, so far as that ineffable woman could be entertained by


Some Reminiscences