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Today's Stichomancy for John Glenn

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Poems of William Blake by William Blake:

And thus her gentle lamentation falls like morning dew.

O life of this our spring! why fades the lotus of the water? Why fade these children of the spring? born but to smile & fall. Ah! Thel is like a watry bow, and like a parting cloud, Like a reflection in a glass: like shadows in the water Like dreams of infants, like a smile upon an infants face. Like the doves voice, like transient day, like music in the air: Ah! gentle may I lay me down and gentle rest my head. And gentle sleep the sleep of death, and gently hear the voice Of him that walketh in the garden in the evening time.

The Lilly of the valley breathing in the humble grass


Poems of William Blake
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from In the Cage by Henry James:

it mainly came to at this period was a picture of how London could amuse itself; and that, with the running commentary of a witness so exclusively a witness, turned for the most part to a hardening of the heart. The nose of this observer was brushed by the bouquet, yet she could never really pluck even a daisy. What could still remain fresh in her daily grind was the immense disparity, the difference and contrast, from class to class, of every instant and every motion. There were times when all the wires in the country seemed to start from the little hole-and-corner where she plied for a livelihood, and where, in the shuffle of feet, the flutter of "forms," the straying of stamps and the ring of change over the

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Egmont by Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe:

Machiavel. I do not understand you.

Regent. You soon will.--For after this preamble he is of opinion that without soldiers, without a small army indeed,---I shall always cut a sorry figure here! We did wrong, he says, to withdraw our troops from the provinces at the remonstrance of the inhabitants; a garrison, he thinks, which shall press upon the neck of the burgher, will prevent him, by its weight, from making any lofty spring.

Machiavel. It would irritate the public mind to the last degree.

Regent. The king thinks, however, do you hear?--he thinks that a clever general, one who never listens to reason, will be able to deal promptly with all parties;--people and nobles, citizens and peasants; he therefore


Egmont