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Today's Stichomancy for Jonas Salk

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The United States Constitution:

by adding to the whole number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons. The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by law Direct. The number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have at least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut five, New York six,


The United States Constitution
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Seraphita by Honore de Balzac:

"I can love nothing here."

"What canst thou love?"

"Heaven."

"Is it worthy of heaven to despise the creatures of God?"

"Minna, can we love two beings at once? Would our beloved be indeed our beloved if he did not fill our hearts? Must he not be the first, the last, the only one? She who is all love, must she not leave the world for her beloved? Human ties are but a memory, she has no ties except to him! Her soul is hers no longer; it is his. If she keeps within her soul anything that is not his, does she love? No, she loves not. To love feebly, is that to love at all? The voice of her beloved


Seraphita
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Eugenie Grandet by Honore de Balzac:

day what your Charles is worth, with his morocco boots and supercilious airs. He has got neither heart nor soul if he dared to carry off a young girl's treasure without the consent of her parents."

When the street-door was shut, Eugenie came out of her room and went to her mother.

"What courage you have had for your daughter's sake!" she said.

"Ah! my child, see where forbidden things may lead us. You forced me to tell a lie."

"I will ask God to punish only me."

"Is it true," cried Nanon, rushing in alarmed, "that mademoiselle is to be kept on bread and water for the rest of her life?"


Eugenie Grandet