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Today's Stichomancy for Keanu Reeves

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Tales of Unrest by Joseph Conrad:

Karain never moved without that attendant, who stood or squatted close at his back. He had a dislike of an open space behind him. It was more than a dislike--it resembled fear, a nervous preoccupation of what went on where he could not see. This, in view of the evident and fierce loyalty that surrounded him, was inexplicable. He was there alone in the midst of devoted men; he was safe from neighbourly ambushes, from fraternal ambitions; and yet more than one of our visitors had assured us that their ruler could not bear to be alone. They said, "Even when he eats and sleeps there is always one on the watch near him who has strength and weapons." There was indeed always one near him, though our informants had no conception of that


Tales of Unrest
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Catriona by Robert Louis Stevenson:

plain sense of our position," said I. "But if your lordship has no need of my testimony, I believe the other side would be extremely blythe to get it."

Prestongrange arose and began to pace to and fro in the room. "You are not so young," he said, "but what you must remember very clearly the year '45 and the shock that went about the country. I read in Pilrig's letter that you are sound in Kirk and State. Who saved them in that fatal year? I do not refer to His Royal Highness and his ramrods, which were extremely useful in their day; but the country had been saved and the field won before ever Cumberland came upon Drummossie. Who saved it? I repeat; who saved the Protestant religion and the

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from On Horsemanship by Xenophon:

approach it, you must teach him that there is nothing to be alarmed at, particularly if he be a plucky animal;[10] or, failing that, touch the formidable object yourself, and then gently lead the horse up to it. The opposite plan of forcing the frightened creature by blows only intensifies its fear, the horse mentally associating the pain he suffers at such a moment with the object of suspicion, which he naturally regards as its cause.

[9] Cf. "Hell." v. iii. 7 for this maxim.

[10] Al. "if possibly by help of another and plucky animal."

If, when the groom brings up the horse to his master to mount, he knows how to make him lower his back,[11] to facilitate mounting, we


On Horsemanship