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Today's Stichomancy for Kim Kardashian

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Works of Samuel Johnson by Samuel Johnson:

they can be safe and happy only by virtue.

[f] Lovely sleep! thou beautiful image of terrible death Be thou my pillow-companion, my angel of rest! Come, O sleep! for thine are the joys of living and dying: Life without sorrow, and death with no anguish, no pain.

From the German of Schmidt.

No. 41. TUESDAY, MARCH 27, 1753

--------Si mutabile pectus Est tibi, consiliis, non curribus, utere nostris; Dum potes, et solidis etiam num sedibus adstas, Dumque male optatos nondum premis inscius axes.

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde:

"That shall be given to you upstairs. I could not give it here. You will not have to read long."

CHAPTER 13

He passed out of the room and began the ascent, Basil Hallward following close behind. They walked softly, as men do instinctively at night. The lamp cast fantastic shadows on the wall and staircase. A rising wind made some of the windows rattle.

When they reached the top landing, Dorian set the lamp down on the floor, and taking out the key, turned it in the lock. "You insist on knowing, Basil?" he asked in a low voice.

"Yes."


The Picture of Dorian Gray
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Economist by Xenophon:

of the soldiery themselves; no, nor him whose skill to hurl a javelin or shoot an arrow will outshine the skilfullest; nor yet that mounted on the fleetest charger it shall be his to bear the brunt of danger foremost amid the knightliest horsemen, the nimblest of light infantry. No, not these, but who is able to implant a firm persuasion in the minds of all his soldiers: follow him they must and will through fire, if need be, or into the jaws of death.[8]

[8] Or, "through flood and fire or other desperate strait." Cf. "Anab." II. vi. 8.

Lofty of soul and large of judgment[9] may he be designated justly, at whose back there steps a multitude stirred by his sole sentiment; not