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Today's Stichomancy for Kirk Douglas

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Tapestried Chamber by Walter Scott:

THE LADY IN THE SACQUE.

The following narrative is given from the pen, so far as memory permits, in the same character in which it was presented to the author's ear; nor has he claim to further praise, or to be more deeply censured, than in proportion to the good or bad judgment which he has employed in selecting his materials, as he has studiously avoided any attempt at ornament which might interfere with the simplicity of the tale.

At the same time, it must be admitted that the particular class of stories which turns on the marvellous possesses a stronger influence when told than when committed to print. The volume

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte:

under pretence of mending the fire.

After this, Mr. Bloomfield was continually looking in to see if the schoolroom was in order; and, as the children were continually littering the floor with fragments of toys, sticks, stones, stubble, leaves, and other rubbish, which I could not prevent their bringing, or oblige them to gather up, and which the servants refused to 'clean after them,' I had to spend a considerable portion of my valuable leisure moments on my knees upon the floor, in painsfully reducing things to order. Once I told them that they should not taste their supper till they had picked up everything from the carpet; Fanny might have hers when she had taken up a


Agnes Grey
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from 1492 by Mary Johntson:

So we sighted Isabella and in the harbor four caravels that had not been there when we had sailed in April.

CHAPTER XXXII

TWO men came into the cabin, Don Diego Colon, left in charge of Hispaniola, and with him a tall, powerful, high-featured man, gray of eye and black and silver of hair and short beard. As he stood beside the bed, one saw that he must be kinsman to the man who lay upon it. ``O Bartholomew! And is this the end?'' cried Don Diego, and I knew that the stranger was that brother, Bartholomew, for whom the Admiral longed.