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Today's Stichomancy for Laurence Fishburne

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Timaeus by Plato:

likely to be most perfect.

TIMAEUS: Yes, Socrates; and what you said of it was very much to our mind.

SOCRATES: Did we not begin by separating the husbandmen and the artisans from the class of defenders of the State?

TIMAEUS: Yes.

SOCRATES: And when we had given to each one that single employment and particular art which was suited to his nature, we spoke of those who were intended to be our warriors, and said that they were to be guardians of the city against attacks from within as well as from without, and to have no other employment; they were to be merciful in judging their subjects, of whom they were by nature friends, but fierce to their enemies, when they

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Poems by Oscar Wilde:

I knew she would die at the autumn fall.

Dame Jeannette had not that gold-brown hair, Old Jeannette was not a maiden fair.

O 't is none of our kith and none of our kin, (Her soul may our Lady assoil from sin!)

But I hear the boy's voice chaunting sweet, 'Elle est morte, la Marguerite.'

Come in, my son, and lie on the bed, And let the dead folk bury their dead.

O mother, you know I loved her true: O mother, hath one grave room for two?

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Ferragus by Honore de Balzac:

Saint-Cloud. Water flowed everywhere; it boiled, it leaped, it murmured; it was black, white, blue, and green; it shrieked, it bubbled under the broom of the portress, a toothless old woman used to storms, who seemed to bless them as she swept into the street a mass of scraps an intelligent inventory of which would have revealed the lives and habits of every dweller in the house,--bits of printed cottons, tea-leaves, artificial flower-petals faded and worthless, vegetable parings, papers, scraps of metal. At every sweep of her broom the old woman bared the soul of the gutter, that black fissure on which a porter's mind is ever bent. The poor lover examined this scene, like a thousand others which our heaving Paris presents daily;


Ferragus