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Today's Stichomancy for Leon Trotsky

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Tanach:

Exodus 25: 34 And in the candlestick four cups made like almond-blossoms, the knops thereof, and the flowers thereof.

Exodus 25: 35 And a knop under two branches of one piece with it, and a knop under two branches of one piece with it, and a knop under two branches of one piece with it, for the six branches going out of the candlestick.

Exodus 25: 36 Their knops and their branches shall be of one piece with it; the whole of it one beaten work of pure gold.

Exodus 25: 37 And thou shalt make the lamps thereof, seven; and they shall light the lamps thereof, to give light over against it.

Exodus 25: 38 And the tongs thereof, and the snuffdishes thereof, shall be of pure gold.

Exodus 25: 39 Of a talent of pure gold shall it be made, with all these vessels.

Exodus 25: 40 And see that thou make them after their pattern, which is being shown thee in the mount.

Exodus 26: 1 Moreover thou shalt make the tabernacle with ten curtains: of fine twined linen, and blue, and purple, and scarlet, with cherubim the work of the skilful workman shalt thou make them.

Exodus 26: 2 The length of each curtain shall be eight and twenty cubits, and the breadth of each curtain four cubits; all the curtains shall have one measure.

Exodus 26: 3 Five curtains shall be coupled together one to another; and the other five curtains shall be coupled one to another.


The Tanach
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Jungle by Upton Sinclair:

"Yes," said Alena; "and she'll help you. She's got a place, and she's doing well; she'll be glad to see you."

It was not much more than a year since Jurgis had left Packingtown, feeling like one escaped from jail; and it had been from Marija and Elzbieta that he was escaping. But now, at the mere mention of them, his whole being cried out with joy. He wanted to see them; he wanted to go home! They would help him--they would be kind to him. In a flash he had thought over the situation. He had a good excuse for running away--his grief at the death of his son; and also he had a good excuse for not returning--the fact that they had left Packingtown. "All right,"

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Talisman by Walter Scott:

pennon. After a few gambols of this kind, the dog, coming close up to his master, laid at once aside his frolicsome mood, relapsed into his usual gravity and slowness of gesture and deportment, and looked as if he were ashamed that anything should have moved him to depart so far out of his sober self-control.

Both knights looked on with pleasure; for Sir Kenneth was justly proud of his noble hound, and the northern English baron was, of course, an admirer of the chase, and a judge of the animal's merits.

"A right able dog," he said. "I think, fair sir, King Richard hath not an ALAN which may match him, if he be as stanch as he is