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Today's Stichomancy for Lewis Carroll

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Essays of Francis Bacon by Francis Bacon:

letter; and by the mediation of a third than by a man's self. Letters are good, when a man would draw an answer by letter back again; or when it may serve for a man's justification afterwards to produce his own letter; or where it may be danger to be interrupted, or heard by pieces. To deal in person is good, when a man's face breedeth regard, as commonly with inferiors; or in tender cases, where a man's eye, upon the countenance of him with whom he speaketh, may give him a direction how far to go; and generally, where a man will


Essays of Francis Bacon
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Men of Iron by Howard Pyle:

certain of the midland counties, and with him travelled the Comte de Vermoise. The Count was the secret emissary of the Dauphin's faction in France, at that time in the very bitterest intensity of the struggle with the Duke of Burgundy, and had come to England seeking aid for his master in his quarrel.

It was not the first time that royalty had visited Devlen. Once, in Earl Robert's day, King Edward II had spent a week at the castle during the period of the Scottish wars. But at that time it was little else than a military post, and was used by the King as such. Now the Beaumonts were in the very flower of their prosperity, and preparations were made for the coming visit of


Men of Iron
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Tao Teh King by Lao-tze:

3. Who is content Needs fear no shame. Who knows to stop Incurs no blame. From danger free Long live shall he.

45. 1. Who thinks his great achievements poor Shall find his vigour long endure. Of greatest fulness, deemed a void, Exhaustion ne'er shall stem the tide. Do thou what's straight still crooked deem;