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Today's Stichomancy for Lizzie Borden

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Complete Angler by Izaak Walton:

upon one another next morning; nor men, that cannot well bear it, to repent the money they spend when they be warmed with drink. And take this for a rule: you may pick out such times and such companies, that you make yourselves merrier for a little than a great deal of money; for "'Tis the company and not the charge that makes the feast "; and such a companion you prove: I thank you for it

But I will not compliment you out of the debt that I owe you, and therefore I will begin my song, and wish it may be so well liked.

The Angler's song.

As inward love breeds outward talk The hound some praise, and some the hawk

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Astoria by Washington Irving:

line of bluffs extended for upwards of thirty miles parallel to the Missouri, with a shallow lake stretching along their base, which had evidently once formed a bed of the river. The surface of this lake was covered with aquatic plants, on the broad leaves of which numbers of water-snakes, drawn forth by the genial warmth of spring, were basking in the sunshine.

On the 2d day of May, at the usual hour of embarking, the camp was thrown into some confusion by two of the hunters, named Harrington, expressing their intention to abandon the expedition and return home. One of these had joined the party in the preceding autumn, having been hunting for two years on the

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll:

one hand and a piece of bread-and-butter in the other.

`He's only just out of prison, and he hadn't finished his tea when he was sent in,' Haigha whispered to Alice: `and they only give them oyster-shells in there--so you see he's very hungry and thirsty. How are you, dear child?' he went on, putting his arm affectionately round Hatta's neck.

Hatta looked round and nodded, and went on with his bread and butter.

`Were you happy in prison, dear child?' said Haigha.

Hatta looked round once more, and this time a tear or two trickled down his cheek: but not a word would he say.


Through the Looking-Glass