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Today's Stichomancy for Lizzie Borden

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from A Prince of Bohemia by Honore de Balzac:

and charity is supposed to be its budget. All these young men are greater than their misfortune; they are under the feet of Fortune, yet more than equal to Fate. Always ready to mount and ride an /if/, witty as a /feuilleton/, blithe as only those can be that are deep in debt and drink deep to match, and finally--for here I come to my point--hot lovers and what lovers! Picture to yourself Lovelace, and Henri Quatre, and the Regent, and Werther, and Saint-Preux, and Rene, and the Marechal de Richelieu--think of all these in a single man, and you will have some idea of their way of love. What lovers! Eclectic of all things in love, they will serve up a passion to a woman's order; their hearts are like a bill of fare in a restaurant. Perhaps they have

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from War and the Future by H. G. Wells:

Castelletto.

The aspect of these mountains is particularly grim and wicked; they are worn old mountains, they tower overhead in enormous vertical cliffs of sallow grey, with the square jointings and occasional clefts and gullies, their summits are toothed and jagged; the path ascends and passes round the side of the mountain upon loose screes, which descend steeply to a lower wall of precipices. In the distance rise other harsh and desolate- looking mountain masses, with shining occasional scars of old snow. Far below is a bleak valley of stunted pine trees through which passes the road of the Dolomites.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from King James Bible:

in guile:

TH1 2:4 But as we were allowed of God to be put in trust with the gospel, even so we speak; not as pleasing men, but God, which trieth our hearts.

TH1 2:5 For neither at any time used we flattering words, as ye know, nor a cloke of covetousness; God is witness:

TH1 2:6 Nor of men sought we glory, neither of you, nor yet of others, when we might have been burdensome, as the apostles of Christ.

TH1 2:7 But we were gentle among you, even as a nurse cherisheth her children:

TH1 2:8 So being affectionately desirous of you, we were willing to


King James Bible