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Today's Stichomancy for Ludwig Wittgenstein

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from A Tramp Abroad by Mark Twain:

of architecture, which same is tightly jammed and compacted within the perfectly round hoop of the ancient village wall.

There is no house outside the wall on the whole hill, or any vestige of a former house; all the houses are inside the wall, but there isn't room for another one. It is really a finished town, and has been finished a very long time. There is no space between the wall and the first circle of buildings; no, the village wall is itself the rear wall of the first circle of buildings, a nd the roofs jut a little over the wall a nd thus furnish it with eaves. The general level of the massed

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Euthydemus by Plato:

number, and we count them, and you are found to be right, we will believe the rest. They fancied that Ctesippus was making game of them, and they refused, and they would only say in answer to each of his questions, that they knew all things. For at last Ctesippus began to throw off all restraint; no question in fact was too bad for him; he would ask them if they knew the foulest things, and they, like wild boars, came rushing on his blows, and fearlessly replied that they did. At last, Crito, I too was carried away by my incredulity, and asked Euthydemus whether Dionysodorus could dance.

Certainly, he replied.

And can he vault among swords, and turn upon a wheel, at his age? has he

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne:

vicissim ad jocos transire.

Joan. Saresberiensis, Episcopus Lugdun.

Chapter 2.I.

Great wits jump: for the moment Dr. Slop cast his eyes upon his bag (which he had not done till the dispute with my uncle Toby about mid-wifery put him in mind of it)--the very same thought occurred.--'Tis God's mercy, quoth he (to himself) that Mrs. Shandy has had so bad a time of it,--else she might have been brought to bed seven times told, before one half of these knots could have got untied.--But here you must distinguish--the thought floated only in Dr. Slop's mind, without sail or ballast to it, as