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Today's Stichomancy for M. C. Escher

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Faraday as a Discoverer by John Tyndall:

pencil.

'We return on Friday, when I will return you the paper.

'Ever truly yours, 'M. Faraday.'

The third letter will come in its proper place towards the end.

While once conversing with Faraday on science, in its relations to commerce and litigation, he said to me, that at a certain period of his career, he was forced definitely to ask himself, and finally to decide whether he should make wealth or science the pursuit of his life. He could not serve both masters, and he was therefore compelled to choose between them. After the discovery of

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Stories From the Old Attic by Robert Harris:

which he had in the past embarked, he took a sip of coffee (or perhaps he had inadvertently been served espresso) and then suddenly opened his eyes widely, sprang to his feet, and announced excitedly, "That's it! I see it all now! Now it can be written! Everything is completely clear! So clear! Ha ha! Now I understand! Now, at last, I understand!"

After this brief speech, he burst out of the coffee shop (leaving his students with expressions of amazement and an unpaid bill) and began to run toward his office where he could finally sit down and produce his great work. Now at last he could pour forth his hitherto inexpressible wisdom to fertilize the orchards of culture

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Moral Emblems by Robert Louis Stevenson:

For why? although to-day she sink, Still safe she sails in printer's ink, And though to-day the seamen drown, My cut shall hand their memory down.

Poem: II

The careful angler chose his nook At morning by the lilied brook, And all the noon his rod he plied By that romantic riverside. Soon as the evening hours decline Tranquilly he'll return to dine,