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Today's Stichomancy for Mel Brooks

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Psychology of Revolution by Gustave le Bon:

1. The Revolutionary Assemblies and the Armies 2. The Struggle of Europe against the Revolution 3. Psychological and Military Factors which determined the success of the Revolutionary Armies

CHAPTER VII. PSYCHOLOGY OF THE LEADERS OF THE REVOLUTION

1. Mentality of the men of the Revolution. The respective influence of violent and feeble characters 2. Psychology of the Commissaries or Representatives ``on Mission'' 3. Danton and Robespierre 4. Fouquier-Tinville, Marat, Billaud-Varenne, &c.

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen:

of his success. When Sir Thomas understood this, he felt the necessity of making his own wife and sister-in-law acquainted with the business without delay; though, on Fanny's account, he almost dreaded the effect of the communication to Mrs. Norris as much as Fanny herself. He deprecated her mistaken but well-meaning zeal. Sir Thomas, indeed, was, by this time, not very far from classing Mrs. Norris as one of those well-meaning people who are always doing mistaken and very disagreeable things.

Mrs. Norris, however, relieved him. He pressed for the strictest forbearance and silence towards


Mansfield Park
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from A Lover's Complaint by William Shakespeare:

And every light occasion of the wind Upon his lips their silken parcels hurls. What's sweet to do, to do will aptly find: Each eye that saw him did enchant the mind; For on his visage was in little drawn, What largeness thinks in paradise was sawn.

'Small show of man was yet upon his chin; His phoenix down began but to appear, Like unshorn velvet, on that termless skin, Whose bare out-bragg'd the web it seemed to wear: Yet show'd his visage by that cost more dear;