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Today's Stichomancy for Moby

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Mirror of the Sea by Joseph Conrad:

steamship about the world (though one would not minimize its responsibilities) has not the same quality of intimacy with nature, which, after all, is an indispensable condition to the building up of an art. It is less personal and a more exact calling; less arduous, but also less gratifying in the lack of close communion between the artist and the medium of his art. It is, in short, less a matter of love. Its effects are measured exactly in time and space as no effect of an art can be. It is an occupation which a man not desperately subject to sea-sickness can be imagined to follow with content, without enthusiasm, with industry, without affection. Punctuality is its watchword. The incertitude which


The Mirror of the Sea
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Two Noble Kinsmen by William Shakespeare:

Nev'r cast your child away for honestie; Cure her first this way, then if shee will be honest, She has the path before her.

IAILOR.

Thanke yee, Doctor.

DOCTOR.

Pray, bring her in, And let's see how shee is.

IAILOR.

I will, and tell her Her Palamon staies for her: But, Doctor,

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Vendetta by Honore de Balzac:

Amelie could get to her. The easel was now surrounded; Servin descanted on the beauty of the copy which his favorite pupil was then making, and the whole class was duped by this stratagem, except Amelie, who, slipping behind her companions, attempted to open the portfolio where she had seen Ginevra throw the sketch. But the latter took it up without a word, and placed it in front of her. The two young girls then looked at each other fixedly, in silence.

"Come, mesdemoiselles, take your places," said Servin. "If you wish to do as well as Mademoiselle di Piombo, you mustn't be always talking fashions and balls, and trifling away your time as you do."

When they were all reseated before their easels, Servin sat down