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Today's Stichomancy for Muhammad Ali

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Grimm's Fairy Tales by Brothers Grimm:

on one foot and a sock on the other; he still had on his apron, and still held the gold chain and the pincers in his hands, and so he stood gazing up at the bird, while the sun came shining brightly down on the street.

'Bird,' he said, 'how beautifully you sing! Sing me that song again.'

'Nay,' said the bird, 'I do not sing twice for nothing. Give that gold chain, and I will sing it you again.'

'Here is the chain, take it,' said the goldsmith. 'Only sing me that again.'

The bird flew down and took the gold chain in his right claw, and then he alighted again in front of the goldsmith and sang:


Grimm's Fairy Tales
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from King Henry VI by William Shakespeare:

[Exit.]

[An alarum: excursions.] [Bedford, brought in sick in a chair. Enter Talbot and Burgundy without: within La Pucelle, Charles, Bastard, Alencon, and Reignier, on the walls.]

PUCELLE. Good morrow, gallants! want ye corn for bread? I think the Duke of Burgundy will fast Before he 'll buy again at such a rate: 'Twas full of darnel: do you like the taste?

BURGUNDY.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The King of the Golden River by John Ruskin:

added to "Modern Painters," and the other notable series upon art, "The Stones of Venice" and "The Seven Lamps of Architecture," were sent forth.

Then, in 1860, when Ruskin was about forty years old, there came a great change. His heaven-born genius for making the appreciation of beauty a common possession was deflected from its true field. He had been asking himself what are the conditions that produce great art, and the answer he found declared that art cannot be separated from life, nor life from industry and industrial conditions. A civilization founded upon unrestricted competition therefore seemed to him necessarily feeble in