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Today's Stichomancy for Natalie Portman

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from American Notes by Rudyard Kipling:

that it was hallowed ground to me, because of Bret Harte. That was true.

"Well," said the reporter, "Bret Harte claims California, but California don't claim Bret Harte. He's been so long in England that he's quite English. Have you seen our cracker factories or the new offices of the 'Examiner'?"

He could not understand that to the outside world the city was worth a great deal less than the man. I never intended to curse the people with a provincialism so vast as this.

But let us return to our sheep--which means the sea-lions of the Cliff House. They are the great show of San Francisco. You take

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Louis Lambert by Honore de Balzac:

the herd as some noble plant in the fields attracts the eye of a botanist in its splendor. This comparison may well be applied to Louis Lambert's adventure; he was accustomed to spend the time allowed him by his uncle for holidays at his father's house; but instead of indulging, after the manner of schoolboys, in the sweets of the delightful /far niente/ that tempts us at every age, he set out every morning with part of a loaf and his books, and went to read and meditate in the woods, to escape his mother's remonstrances, for she believed such persistent study to be injurious. How admirable is a mother's instinct! From that time reading was in Louis a sort of appetite which nothing could satisfy; he devoured books of every kind,


Louis Lambert
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Market-Place by Harold Frederic:

as you've finally settled with Rostocker and the other fellow," he called after him, and began pacing the floor again.

It was nearly four o'clock when these two men, again together in the Board Room, and having finished the inspection of some papers on the desk, sat upright and looked at each other in tacit recognition that final words were to be spoken.

"Well, Semple," Thorpe began, after that significant little pause, "I want to say that I'm damned glad you've done so well for yourself in this affair. You've been as straight as a die to me,--I owe it as much to you as I do to myself,--and if you don't


The Market-Place