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Today's Stichomancy for Pablo Picasso

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Red Inn by Honore de Balzac:

the mistress of a German inn (a costume which has been so often depicted in colored prints that it is too common to describe here),-- well, this wife of the innkeeper kept the two friends alternately patient and impatient with remarkable ability.

Little by little the noise decreased, the various travellers retired to their rooms, the clouds of smoke dispersed. When places were set for the two young men, and the classic carp of the Rhine appeared upon the table, eleven o'clock was striking and the room was empty. The silence of night enabled the young surgeons to hear vaguely the noise their horses made in eating their provender, and the murmur of the waters of the Rhine, together with those indefinable sounds which

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from In the South Seas by Robert Louis Stevenson:

most chaste of Polynesians, and they are to this day entirely fertile; Marquesans are the most debauched: we have seen how they are perishing; Hawaiians are notoriously lax, and they begin to be dotted among deserts. So here is a case stronger still against unchastity; and here also we have a correction to apply. Whatever the virtues of the Tahitian, neither friend nor enemy dares call him chaste; and yet he seems to have outlived the time of danger. One last example: syphilis has been plausibly credited with much of the sterility. But the Samoans are, by all accounts, as fruitful as at first; by some accounts more so; and it is not seriously to be argued that the Samoans have escaped syphilis.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Venus and Adonis by William Shakespeare:

His tenderer cheek receives her soft hand's print, As apt as new-fall'n snow takes any dint.

O! what a war of looks was then between them; Her eyes petitioners to his eyes suing; 356 His eyes saw her eyes as they had not seen them; Her eyes woo'd still, his eyes disdain'd the wooing: And all this dumb play had his acts made plain With tears, which, chorus-like, her eyes did rain.

Full gently now she takes him by the hand, 361 A lily prison'd in a gaol of snow, Or ivory in an alabaster band;