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Today's Stichomancy for Pamela Anderson

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Intentions by Oscar Wilde:

of the importance given to such a vulgar thing as a handkerchief, and his attempt to soften its grossness by making the Moor reiterate 'Le bandeau! le bandeau!' may be taken as an example of the difference between LA TRAGEDIE PHILOSOPHIQUE and the drama of real life; and the introduction for the first time of the word MOUCHOIR at the Theatre Francais was an era in that romantic- realistic movement of which Hugo is the father and M. Zola the ENFANT TERRIBLE, just as the classicism of the earlier part of the century was emphasised by Talma's refusal to play Greek heroes any longer in a powdered periwig - one of the many instances, by the way, of that desire for archaeological accuracy in dress which has

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Before Adam by Jack London:

him and out-climb him. He could never catch us, that was certain.

But he carried something in his hand that I had never seen before. It was a bow and arrow. But at that time a bow and arrow had no meaning for me. How was I to know that death lurked in that bent piece of wood? But Lop-Ear knew. He had evidently seen the Fire People before and knew something of their ways. The Fire-Man peered up at him and circled around the tree. And around the main trunk above the fork Lop-Ear circled too, keeping always the trunk between himself and the

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Alcibiades II by Platonic Imitator:

is under some other guidance, will make, as he deserves, a sorry voyage:-- he will, I believe, hurry through the brief space of human life, pilotless in mid-ocean, and the words will apply to him in which the poet blamed his enemy:--

'...Full many a thing he knew; But knew them all badly.' (A fragment from the pseudo-Homeric poem, 'Margites.')

ALCIBIADES: How in the world, Socrates, do the words of the poet apply to him? They seem to me to have no bearing on the point whatever.

SOCRATES: Quite the contrary, my sweet friend: only the poet is talking in riddles after the fashion of his tribe. For all poetry has by nature an