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Today's Stichomancy for Pamela Colman Smith

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from A Start in Life by Honore de Balzac:

Faith! I was disgusted with France; I couldn't stand it. In fact, I should certainly have got myself arrested; so off I went, with two or three dashing fellows,--Selves, Besson, and others, who are now in Egypt,--and we entered the service of pacha Mohammed; a queer sort of fellow he was, too! Once a tobacco merchant in the bazaars, he is now on the high-road to be a sovereign prince. You've all seen him in that picture by Horace Vernet,--'The Massacre of the Mameluks.' What a handsome fellow he was! But I wouldn't give up the religion of my fathers and embrace Islamism; all the more because the abjuration required a surgical operation which I hadn't any fancy for. Besides, nobody respects a renegade. Now if they had offered me a hundred

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The United States Constitution:

until the Disability be removed, or a President shall be elected.

The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a Compensation, which shall neither be encreased nor diminished during the Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them.

Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the following Oath or Affirmation:--"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States."

Section 2. The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army


The United States Constitution
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Poor and Proud by Oliver Optic:

afraid you will be sick, and then what should we do?"

"O, I shan't get sick; I promise you I won't," replied Katy, as she left the room.

Unfortunately for the little candy merchant it was Wednesday afternoon, and as the schools did not keep, there were a great many boys in the street, and many of them were very rude, naughty boys. When she passed up the court, some of them called out to her, and asked her where she was going with all that candy. She took no notice of them, for they spoke very rudely, and were no friends of hers. Among them was Johnny Grippen, whose acquaintance the reader made on the pier of South Boston bridge.