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Today's Stichomancy for Rachel Weisz

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery:

CHAPTER IX Mrs. Rachel Lynde Is Properly Horrified CHAPTER X Anne's Apology CHAPTER XI Anne's Impressions of Sunday School CHAPTER XII A Solemn Vow and Promise CHAPTER XIII The Delights of Anticipation CHAPTER XIV Anne's Confession CHAPTER XV A Tempest in the School Teapot CHAPTER XVI Diana Is Invited to Tea with Tragic Results CHAPTER XVII A New Interest in Life CHAPTER XVIII Anne to the Rescue CHAPTER XIX A Concert a Catastrophe and a Confession

Anne of Green Gables
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Aspern Papers by Henry James:

I could not accept. I could not, for a bundle of tattered papers, marry a ridiculous, pathetic, provincial old woman. it was a proof that she did not think the idea would come to me, her having determined to suggest it herself in that practical, argumentative, heroic way, in which the timidity however had been so much more striking than the boldness that her reasons appeared to come first and her feelings afterward.

As the day went on I grew to wish that I had never heard of Aspern's relics, and I cursed the extravagant curiosity that had put John Cumnor on the scent of them. We had more than enough material without them, and my

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Nada the Lily by H. Rider Haggard:

those who fell in the fray are picked clean by the vultures, all except Galazi, for the old wolf Deathgrip lies on his breast dying, but not dead, licking my brother's wounds, and scares the fowls away. It was the beak of a vulture, who had smelt me out at last, that woke me from my sleep beneath the stone, Nada, and I crept hither. Would that he had not awakened me, would that I had died as I lay, rather than lived a little while till you perish thus, like a trapped fox, Nada, and presently I follow you."

"It is hard to die so, Umslopogaas," she answered, "I who am yet young and fair, who love you, and hoped to give you children; but so it has come about, and it may not be put away. I am well-nigh sped, husband;

Nada the Lily