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Today's Stichomancy for Salma Hayek

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Redheaded Outfield by Zane Grey:

of pace. Both styles were absolutely impractical with the ``rabbit.''

``It's comin' to us, all right, all right!'' yelled Deerfoot to me, across the intervening grass. I was of the opinion that it did not take any genius to make Deerfoot's ominous prophecy.

Old man Hathaway gazed at Merritt on the bench as if he wished the manager could hear what he was calling him and then at his fellow- players as if both to warn and beseech them. Then he pitched the ``rabbit.''


The Redheaded Outfield
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Walden by Henry David Thoreau:

went far enough to please my imagination. I believe that every man who has ever been earnest to preserve his higher or poetic faculties in the best condition has been particularly inclined to abstain from animal food, and from much food of any kind. It is a significant fact, stated by entomologists -- I find it in Kirby and Spence -- that "some insects in their perfect state, though furnished with organs of feeding, make no use of them"; and they lay it down as "a general rule, that almost all insects in this state eat much less than in that of larvae. The voracious caterpillar when transformed into a butterfly ... and the gluttonous maggot when become a fly" content themselves with a drop or two of honey or some other sweet


Walden
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Peter Pan by James M. Barrie:

Hook, who seemed to have a charmed life, as he kept them at bay in that circle of fire. They had done for his dogs, but this man alone seemed to be a match for them all. Again and again they closed upon him, and again and again he hewed a clear space. He had lifted up one boy with his hook, and was using him as a buckler [shield], when another, who had just passed his sword through Mullins, sprang into the fray.

"Put up your swords, boys," cried the newcomer, "this man is mine."

Thus suddenly Hook found himself face to face with Peter. The others drew back and formed a ring around them.


Peter Pan