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Today's Stichomancy for Sammy Davis Jr.

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie:

man, and we must use any means in our power-- otherwise he will slip through our fingers. That is why I have been careful to remain in the background. All the discoveries have been made by Japp, and Japp will take all the credit. If I am called upon to give evidence at all"--he smiled broadly-- "it will probably be as a witness for the defence."

I could hardly believe my ears.

"It is quite en regle," continued Poirot. "Strangely enough, I can give evidence that will demolish one contention of the prosecution."

"Which one?"


The Mysterious Affair at Styles
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from A Horse's Tale by Mark Twain:

composed for the occasion by the bandmaster of the Seventh; and the child was as serious as the most serious war-worn soldier of them all; and finally when they throned her upon the shoulder of the oldest veteran, and pronounced her "well and truly adopted," and the bands struck up and all saluted and she saluted in return, it was better and more moving than any kindred thing I have seen on the stage, because stage things are make-believe, but this was real and the players' hearts were in it.

It happened several weeks ago, and was followed by some additional solemnities. The men created a couple of new ranks, thitherto unknown to the army regulations, and conferred them upon Cathy,

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Mother by Owen Wister:

gazed at the Wall Street edition of the afternoon paper that I had purchased as I came through the Grand Central Station. Ethel and I read it in the evening."

"'I wonder what she's buying now?' said Ethel, vindictively."

"'Well, I can't help feeling sorry for her,' I answered, with as much of a smile as I could produce."

"'That is so unnecessary, Richard! She can easily afford to gratify her gambling instinct.'"

"'There you go, Ethel, inventing millions for her just as you invented grandchildren.'"

"'Not at all. Unless she constantly had money lying idle, she could not