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Today's Stichomancy for Sarah Jessica Parker

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Reign of King Edward the Third by William Shakespeare:

In shining plate, that now the aspiring hill Shews like a silver quarry or an orb, Aloft the which the Banners, bannarets, And new replenished pendants cuff the air And beat the winds, that for their gaudiness Struggles to kiss them: on our left hand lies Phillip, the younger issue of the king, Coating the other hill in such array, That all his guilded upright pikes do seem Straight trees of gold, the pendants leaves; And their device of Antique heraldry,

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Twelve Stories and a Dream by H. G. Wells:

clear and pleasant. As they came under the white cliffs the young man put his book of poetry away, and when at last the train stopped beside the boat, he displayed a graceful alacrity with the impedimenta of Miss Winchelsea and her friends. Miss Winchelsea hated nonsense, but she was pleased to see the young man perceived at once that they were ladies, and helped them without any violent geniality; and how nicely he showed that his civilities were to be no excuse for further intrusions. None of her little party had been out of England before, and they were all excited and a little nervous at the Channel passage. They stood in a little group in a good place near the middle of the boat--the young man had taken Miss Winchelsea's

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Touchstone by Edith Wharton:

New York to live and exchanged the faded pleasures of intercourse for the comparative novelty of correspondence. Her letters, oddly enough, seemed at first to bring her nearer than her presence. She had adopted, and she successfully maintained, a note as affectionately impersonal as his own; she wrote ardently of her work, she questioned him about his, she even bantered him on the inevitable pretty girl who was certain before long to divert the current of his confidences. To Glennard, who was almost a stranger in New York, the sight of Mrs. Aubyn's writing was like a voice of reassurance in surroundings as yet insufficiently aware of him. His vanity found a retrospective enjoyment in the