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Today's Stichomancy for Sarah Michelle Gellar

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass:

exercises of religion, contrasted with my then present lot, but increased my anguish.

I suffered bodily as well as mentally. I had neither sufficient time in which to eat or to sleep, except on Sundays. The overwork, and the brutal chastisements of which I was the victim, combined with that ever-gnawing and soul-devouring thought--"_I am a slave--a slave for life--a slave with no rational ground to hope for freedom_"--rendered me a living embodiment of mental and physical wretchedness.

CHAPTER XVI _Another Pressure of the Tyrant's Vice_


My Bondage and My Freedom
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Land that Time Forgot by Edgar Rice Burroughs:

The sun never shone; the rain scarcely ever ceased falling. The beasts I met with were fewer in number but infinitely more terrible in temper; yet I lived on until there came to me the realization that I was hopelessly lost, that a year of sunshine would not again give me my bearings; and while I was cast down by this terrifying knowledge, the knowledge that I never again could find Lys, I stumbled upon another grave--the grave of William James, with its little crude headstone and its scrawled characters recording that he had died upon the 13th of September--killed by a saber-tooth tiger.

I think that I almost gave up then. Never in my life have I felt


The Land that Time Forgot
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Hamlet by William Shakespeare:

Vnto the voyce and yeelding of that Body, Whereof he is the Head. Then if he sayes he loues you, It fits your wisedome so farre to beleeue it; As he in his peculiar Sect and force May giue his saying deed: which is no further, Then the maine voyce of Denmarke goes withall. Then weight what losse your Honour may sustaine, If with too credent eare you list his Songs; Or lose your Heart; or your chast Treasure open To his vnmastred importunity. Feare it Ophelia, feare it my deare Sister,


Hamlet