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Today's Stichomancy for Sergio Leone

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Sylvie and Bruno by Lewis Carroll:

moment: and the Common-place reigned supreme. I turned in the direction of the Earl's house, as it was now 'the witching hour' of five, and I knew I should find them ready for a cup of tea and a quiet chat.

Lady Muriel and her father gave me a delightfully warm welcome. They were not of the folk we meet in fashionable drawing-rooms who conceal all such feelings as they may chance to possess beneath the impenetrable mask of a conventional placidity. 'The Man with the Iron Mask' was, no doubt, a rarity and a marvel in his own age: in modern London no one would turn his head to give him a second look! No, these were real people. When they looked pleased, it meant that they were pleased: and when Lady Muriel said, with a bright smile, "I'm very glad to see you again!",


Sylvie and Bruno
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The American by Henry James:

My mother has always been very good to me; that's all I can say. I must not judge her; I must not criticize her. If I did, it would come back to me. I can't change!"

"No," said Newman, bitterly; "I must change--if I break in two in the effort!"

"You are different. You are a man; you will get over it. You have all kinds of consolation. You were born--you were trained, to changes. Besides--besides, I shall always think of you."

"I don't care for that!" cried Newman. "You are cruel--you are terribly cruel. God forgive you! You may have the best reasons and the finest feelings in the world; that makes no difference.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from United States Declaration of Independence:

foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended legislation:

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:

For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from Punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:

For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world:

For imposing taxes on us without our Consent:

For depriving us, in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by Jury:

For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences:

For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government,


United States Declaration of Independence