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Today's Stichomancy for Sergio Leone

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Menexenus by Plato:

alive, until I feel quite elevated by their laudations, and I stand listening to their words, Menexenus, and become enchanted by them, and all in a moment I imagine myself to have become a greater and nobler and finer man than I was before. And if, as often happens, there are any foreigners who accompany me to the speech, I become suddenly conscious of having a sort of triumph over them, and they seem to experience a corresponding feeling of admiration at me, and at the greatness of the city, which appears to them, when they are under the influence of the speaker, more wonderful than ever. This consciousness of dignity lasts me more than three days, and not until the fourth or fifth day do I come to my senses and know where I am; in the meantime I have been living in the Islands of

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Statesman by Plato:

is about to go into a far country, and is expecting to be a long time away from his patients--thinking that his instructions will not be remembered unless they are written down, he will leave notes of them for the use of his pupils or patients.

YOUNG SOCRATES: True.

STRANGER: But what would you say, if he came back sooner than he had intended, and, owing to an unexpected change of the winds or other celestial influences, something else happened to be better for them,--would he not venture to suggest this new remedy, although not contemplated in his former prescription? Would he persist in observing the original law, neither himself giving any new commandments, nor the patient daring to do


Statesman
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Poems by Oscar Wilde:

Nay, go not thou to the red-roofed town Lest the hoofs of the war-horse tread thee down.

But I would not go where the Squires ride, I would only walk by my Lady's side.

Alack! and alack! thou art overbold, A Forester's son may not eat off gold.

Will she love me the less that my Father is seen Each Martinmas day in a doublet green?

Perchance she is sewing at tapestrie, Spindle and loom are not meet for thee.

Ah, if she is working the arras bright